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hiyō aircraft carrier

53–54; Rohwer, p. 244, Shipwrecks and maritime incidents in June 1944, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Japanese_aircraft_carrier_Hiyō&oldid=999265037, World War II shipwrecks in the Philippine Sea, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing Japanese-language text, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Nippon Yusen Kaisha (Japan Mail Steamship Company), This page was last edited on 9 January 2021, at 08:42. Aircraft carriers that sunk (under any circumstances) during hostilities between September 1939 and August 1945. Junyō was the first of the sisters to be completed in May 1942 and the ship participated in the invasion of the Aleutian Islands the following month. To facilitate this process, they were fitted with a double hull, additional fuel oil capacity, provisions for the fitting of additional transverse and longitudinal bulkheads, installation of a longitudinal bulkhead to separate the turbine rooms, a strengthened main deck, more height between decks, rearrangement of the superstructure and passenger accommodations to facilitate the installation of aircraft elevators and hangars, more space for additional wiring, installation of a bulbous bow and the addition of aviation gasoline storage tanks fore and aft of the machinery spaces. Two of these last four mounts were mounted on the stern and the others were placed in front of and behind the island. The ship was under repair until March 1945 when the repairs were deemed uneconomical. 15. The carriers began launching their first air strike of 26 bomb-carrying A6M2 Zeros, 7 B6Ns and 16 A6M5 Zeros as escorts around 09:30. The Hiyō class aircraft carriers (飛鷹型航空母艦 Hiyō-gata kōkūbokan?) Hiyō was sunk by a gasoline vapor explosion caused by an American torpedo hit during the Battle of the Philippine Sea in mid-1944 while Junyō was damaged by several bombs. Hiyō's fighter pilots claimed to have shot down three Allied aircraft without loss and the bombers sank two transports. IJN Hiyō aircraft carrier, lead ship of her class. [7], Their air group was originally intended to consist of 12 Mitsubishi A5M 'Claude' fighters, plus four in storage, 18 Aichi D3A 'Val' dive bombers, plus two in reserve, and 18 Nakajima B5N 'Kate' torpedo bombers. [7], As a conversion from an ocean liner, it was not possible to add much armour, although the ship had a double hull. The ship arrived there on 22 December and disembarked her aircraft before proceeding to Saipan to deliver more aircraft. [28], Junyō ferried aircraft to Singapore in mid-August and troops and equipment to the Caroline Islands the following month. The ship's fighters were unable to do so; seven transports were sunk and the remaining four transports were damaged. Last Friday I asked people if they would rather be a US Navy or a US Air Force pilot. Although it was possible to fit all these aircraft into the hangars, eight or nine were usually stored on the flight deck to reduce crowding below decks. On 5 November 1943, she was hit by a torpedo, but the damage was light, other than the disabled rudder. [14] Her air group consisted of 27 Zeros and 12 D3As and they were detached from Hiyō in early April to participate in Operation I-Go, a land-based aerial offensive against Allied bases in the Solomon Islands and New Guinea. The ship carried enough fuel oil to give her a range of 11,700 nautical miles (21,700 km; 13,500 mi) at 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph). Saved by Piotr. Saved by Sam#28. However, the location lacked an airfield on which to train the green pilots and American submarines were very active in the vicinity which restricted the ships to the anchorage. Junyō carried 18 A6M2 Zeros and 18 D3As for this operation. Media in category "Hiyō (ship, 1942)" The following 2 files are in this category, out … Aside from a brief refit at Kure from 26 February to 4 March 1943 that saw her anti-aircraft armament augmented and an additional radar installed, the ship was training in the Inland Sea until she sailed for Truk on 22 March. [10] They fired 23.45-kilogram (51.7 lb) projectiles at a rate between 8 and 14 rounds per minute at a muzzle velocity of 700–725 m/s (2,300–2,380 ft/s); at 45°, this provided a maximum range of 14,800 meters (16,200 yd), and a maximum ceiling of 9,400 meters (30,800 ft). Some of her aircraft were transferred to her sister before she departed. Two hours later, a large explosion occurred when leaking gasoline vapour ignited and knocked out all power on the ship. Her aircraft made hits on the carrier Hornet, the battleship South Dakota and the light cruiser San Juan, but inflicted little substantial damage. The torpedo knocked out the starboard engine room and started fires but Hiyō was able to continue, at reduced speed. Efforts to camouflage the ship began on 23 April and she was reclassified as a guard ship on 20 June. One of Jun'yō's B5Ns was forced to turn back with mechanical problems; the rest reached their objective and discovered two destroyers bombarding Japanese supply dumps on Guadalcanal around 07:20. [14] Hiyō's fighters were flown to Truk by 15 July and assigned to the light carrier Ryūhō, as were Sakamaki and his staff. Most of its remaining personnel were assigned to Air Group 653. A dozen single mounts were also added, some of which were portable and could be mounted on tie-down points on the flight deck. [14][15], A fire in the ship's generator room occurred on 21 October and reduced her top speed to 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) so Kakuta transferred his flag to Jun'yō while Hiyō returned to Truk for repairs. [9] They fired .25-kilogram (0.55 lb) projectiles at a muzzle velocity of 900 m/s (3,000 ft/s); this provided a maximum range of 7,500 meters (8,202 yd), and an effective ceiling of 5,500 meters (18,000 ft) at +85°. On 14 April, the Japanese attacked Milne Bay, New Guinea, with a large force escorted by 75 Zeros contributed by all the carriers involved. In exchange for a 60% subsidy of their building costs by the Navy Ministry, they were designed to be converted to aircraft carriers. One defending fighter was claimed for the loss of a single dive bomber. Some of the aircraft headed for airfields at Rota and Guam to refuel while the remainder headed back to the carriers. The cost to convert the two ships was budgeted at ¥38,073,000, for a grand total of ¥114,219,000. This was angled 26° outwards to help keep its exhaust from interfering with flight operations. [13], Two Type 94 high-angle fire-control directors, one on each side of the ship, were fitted to control the Type 89 guns. A 3DCG Animation of Imperia Japanese Aircraft Carrier Jyunyo and Hiyo. Early warning was provided by two Type 2, Mark 2, Model 1 air search radars. [9], The primary armament consisted of a dozen 40-caliber 12.7 cm Type 89 anti-aircraft (AA) guns in twin mounts on sponsons along the sides of the hull. Hiyō (Japanese: 飛鷹 "Flying Hawk")1 was a Hiyō-class aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Hiyō class aircraft carriers (飛鷹型航空母艦, Hiyō-gata kōkūbokan?) Three Zeros, one D3A and five B5Ns were also transferred to Jun'yō before she left. This was revised to substitute a dozen Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighters and three in storage for the A5Ms by the time the ship was commissioned in 1942. “So several days later [after the aircraft carrier manoeuvres], we launched the DF-21 and DF-26, and the missiles hit a vessel sailing south of the Paracel Islands,” Wang said at a … Hits in the starboard bow and boiler room knocked out all power but she managed to return to Japan the following day after restoring power. Now the flagship of the Second Carrier Division under Rear Admiral Munetaka Sakamaki, Hiyō departed Yokosuka on 7 June with Junyō en route for Truk. The designs of Izumo Maru and her sister ship Kashiwara Maru were based on the German ocean liner SS Bremen (1928), although they were only about half that ship's size at 27,700 gross register tons (GRT). Hiyō's aircraft attacked USS Aaron Ward seven minutes later without effect, and the American ship shot down one B5N and damaged another which was forced to make a crash landing. The first of these was mounted on the top of the island shortly before she was completed in July 1942 and the other was added later in the year. While their ship is under repair, HIYO's aircraft (21 A6M2 fighters, 9 B5N2 attack planes, 18 D3A2 dive bombers) and crew are assigned to temporary duty on the light carrier RYUHO. [17] Allied naval losses during the entire day included Aaron Ward, the oil tanker Kanawha, the minesweeper HMNZS Moa and damage to a transport and another tanker, although it is uncertain which aircraft sank or damaged each ship. [8], The ship's primary armament consisted of a dozen 12.7-centimetre (5 in) Type 89 dual-purpose guns in twin mounts on sponsons along the sides of the hull. By the end of the year, six more Zeros replaced an equal number of D3As. The first of these was mounted on the top of the island in mid- to late 1942 on each ship, and the other was added during 1943. Four Type 95 directors controlled the 2.5 cm guns and another pair were added in early 1943. Although it was possible to fit all these aircraft into the hangars, 8 or 9 were usually stored on the flight deck to reduce congestion below decks. Lengerer, Hans; Rehm-Takahara, Tomoko (1985). Japan's Hiyō-class aircraft carrier fall into this group, though only just, as under IJN instruction warship elements were incorporated into their ocean liner design specs. The ship was not badly damaged, but the damage did stop flight operations. 17, 106–107, Hata, Izawa & Shores, pp. Completed shortly after the Battle of Midway in June 1942, she participated in the Guadalcanal Campaign, but missed the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands in October because of an electrical generator fire. [5] A large island was fitted on the starboard side that was integrated with, for the first time in a Japanese carrier, the ship's funnel. Hiyō-class aircraft carrier: Displacement: 24,150 metric tons (23,770 long tons) Length: 219.32 m (719 ft 7 in) Beam: 26.7 m (87 ft 7 in) Draft: 8.15 m (26 ft 9 in) Installed power: 56,250 shp (41,950 kW) 6 Kampon water-tube boilers; Propulsion: 2 shafts; 2 geared steam turbine sets; Speed: 25.5 knots (47.2 km/h; 29.3 mph) Range: [25], At dusk, the Japanese turned away to the north west to regroup and to refuel and the Americans turned west to close the distance. were built for the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. While being repaired at Yokosuka until 15 September, more 2.5 cm Type 96 AA guns were installed, and Sumikawa was relieved by Captain Tamotsu Furukawa on 1 September. Junyō was then effectively hulked for the rest of the war. The JDS Hiyō class escort carriers (飛鷹型航空母艦 Hiyō-gata kōkūbokan) were built for the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. Their machinery, designed for merchant service, was over four times heavier that that of the purpose-built aircraft carrier Hiryū. The ship was under repair and refit until 29 February 1944 at Kure. The ships conducted training for their aircraft in the Inland Sea until 11 May when she sailed for Tawi-Tawi in the Philippines. Each hangar could be subdivided by four fire curtains and they were fitted with fire fighting foam dispensers on each side. By the end of the year, 6 more Zeros replaced an equal number of D3As, giving totals of 27 A6Ms, 12 D3As and 9 B5Ns. Guadalcanal Campaign Kingdom Of Italy Navy Carriers Navy Aircraft Carrier Imperial Japanese Navy … Escorted by 24 Zeros from Hiyō and another 6 from the light carrier Zuihō, the D3As attacked shipping in the Sealark Channel. The Japanese Navy had restructured its carrier air groups so that one air group was assigned to one carrier division and the 652nd Naval Air Group was assigned to the Second Carrier Division with Hiyō, Jun'yō and Ryūhō. Hiyō (飛鷹, "Flying Hawk") was the name ship of her class of two aircraft carriers of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). [19] The air groups of both carriers were reconstituted at Singapore on 1 November. [11] The ships were also initially equipped with eight triple 25 mm Type 96 light AA guns, also in sponsons along the sides of the hull. Junyō was stricken from the Navy List on 30 November and scrapped between 1 June 1946 and 1 August 1947 by the Sasebo Ship Company. [19] While returning from Manila, Junyō was attacked by the submarines Sea Devil, Plaice and Redfish early in the morning of 9 December 1944. in 1939, she was purchased by the Navy Ministry in 1941 for conversion to an aircraft carrier. [2] Their crew ranged from 1,187 to 1,224 officers and enlisted men. Her air group was reassigned to her on 2 March, albeit without aircraft. In Lambert, Andrew. If completed as designed, they would have been the largest ocean liners in Japan. The escorts claimed to have shot down three American aircraft for the loss of one Zero and three dive bombers. [26], Hiyō departed Japan for Singapore on 24 November. She was hit by three torpedoes, but she was able to proceed on one engine. Image-Japanese aircraft carrier Junyo 2 cropped - Hiyō-class aircraft carrier - Wikipedia. USS Enterprise (CV-6), often called the "Big E," was the sixth aircraft carrier of the United States Navy.She was also the seventh U.S. Navy ship to use the name.She was launched in 1936 and was a Yorktown class aircraft carrier. The two carriers were intended to play a prominent role in the Japanese effort to retake Guadalcanal Island and were assigned to the Advance Force for this operation. The ships were ordered as the fast luxury passenger liners Izumo Maru and Kashiwara Maru by Nippon Yusen Kaisha (Japan Mail Steamship Company-NYK) in late 1938. The ship was deemed not worth the cost to repair by the Americans after the surrender of Japan in September and she was broken up in 1946–47. She was sunk by a gasoline-vapour explosion caused by an American torpedo hit during the Battle of the Philippine Sea on 20 June 1944 with the loss of 247 officers and ratings, about a fifth of her complement. Only an A6M5, a D4Y and seven D3As of the 49 Japanese aircraft survived the encounter and landed. [13], Lengerer & Rehm-Takahara, pp. Captain Michio Sumikawa relieved Beppu on 30 November. The ship launched her first airstrike at dawn on 3 June against Dutch Harbor on Unalaska Island. "The Japanese Aircraft Carriers Junyo and Hiyo". Shōkaku. The two Hiyō-class light aircraft carriers (Hiyō and Jun'yō) were originally laid down as luxury passenger liners before being acquired by the IJN for conversion to aircraft carriers in 1941. Late the next day, the Japanese were subjected to American carrier air attack, suffering the loss of several ships, including the carrier Hiyō. She accomplished little during this operation, losing five aircraft to all causes, and her own aircraft only shot down five American aircraft. Ozawa decided to launch his air strikes early the following morning so the Japanese turned south to maintain a constant distance between them and the American carriers. The carrier's aircraft were disembarked several times and used from land bases in battles in the South West Pacific. After the Battle of the Philippine Sea in June 1944, Junyō's anti-aircraft armament was reinforced with three more triple mounts, two twin mounts and 18 single mounts for the 25 mm Type 96 gun. [3], Both ships were fitted with two Mitsubishi-Curtis geared steam turbine sets with a total of 56,250 shaft horsepower (41,950 kW), each driving a 5.5-meter (18 ft) propeller. More seriously, the ship was struck by one torpedo dropped by a Grumman TBF Avenger from Belleau Wood. [26] Hiyō was struck by two bombs, one of which detonated above the bridge and killed or wounded virtually everyone there. [14] In October 1944, Junyō had a total of 91 25 mm barrels; 57 in 19 triple mounts, four in two twin mounts, and 30 single mounts. They discovered the retiring Japanese fleet during the afternoon of the following day and Vice-Admiral Marc Mitscher ordered an air strike. The Americans failed to detect the Japanese ships that day. Hiyō was torpedoed in mid-1943 and spent three months under repair. Hiyō (飛鷹, "Flying Hawk")[1] was the name ship of her class of two aircraft carriers of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). Completed shortly after the Battle of Midway in June 1942, she participated in the Guadalcanal Campaign, but missed the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands in October because of an electrical generator fire. [24], A second air strike of 27 D3As, 9 D4Ys, 2 B6Ns and 26 escorting Zeros was launched around 11:00, accompanied by at least 18 A6Ms and B6Ns from the carriers Shōkaku and Zuikaku.

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